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What Are The Symptoms Of Kidney

What Is Chronic Kidney Disease

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Chronic kidney disease occurs when one suffers from gradual and usually permanent loss of kidney function over time. This happens gradually, usually over months to years. Chronic kidney disease is divided into five stages of increasing severity:

  • Stage I: Slight damage to the kidney damage
  • Stage II: Mild decrease in kidney function
  • Stage III: Moderate decrease in kidney function
  • Stage 4: Severe decrease in kidney function
  • Stage 5: Kidney failure

With the loss of kidney function, there is an accumulation of water, waste, and toxic substances in the body that are normally excreted by the kidney. Loss of kidney function also causes other problems such as anemia, high blood pressure, acidosis , disorders of cholesterol and fatty acids, and bone disease.

The term “renal” refers to the kidney, so another name for kidney failure is “renal failure.” Mild kidney disease is often called renal insufficiency.

How Long Do Kidney Stone Symptoms Last

As mentioned, the time frame for these symptoms can be as short as a week or up to a month and beyond. So, even if it feels like your kidney stone pain has subsided, it’s important to reach out to your doctor since sporadic pain is common with this condition.

“While some kidney stones pass on their own, others require treatment such as medications or procedures to help break up the stone or even surgical removal. Your doctor can perform the tests needed to determine whether the stone is likely to pass on its own or if you might need treatment. In addition, your doctor can help you manage the pain associated with passing the stone,” adds Dr. Kannady.

Treatment Of Advanced Or Metastatic Cancer

Surgery is sometimes used to remove cancer that has spread. The surgery is usually followed by other treatment, such as:

  • medicines that stop cancer cells from growing.

These treatments may also be used without surgery.

Pain is one of the main concerns of people with advanced kidney cancer. But cancer pain can almost always be controlled. Treatments that may help include:

  • Surgery. Sometimes surgery can help ease pain by removing some of the cancer that has spread to other parts of the body.
  • Radiation therapy and medicines for bone problems. These can help with pain from bone tumours.
  • Pain medicines.

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Treatment For Kidney Disease

If detected early enough, the progress of kidney disease can be slowed and sometimes even prevented. In the early stages, changes to diet and medication can help to increase the life of your kidneys.

If kidney function is reduced to less than 10 per cent of normal, the loss of function must be replaced by dialysis or a kidney transplant. Dialysis is a treatment for kidney failure that removes waste products and extra water from the blood by filtering it through a special membrane .

Biopsy For Kidney Disease

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A biopsy means that a small piece of tissue is taken for testing in a laboratory. Biopsies used in the investigation of kidney disease may include:

  • kidney biopsy the doctor inserts a special needle into the back, under local anaesthesia, to obtain a small sample of kidney tissue. A kidney biopsy can confirm a diagnosis of chronic kidney disease.
  • bladder biopsy the doctor inserts a thin tube into the bladder via the urethra. This allows the doctor to view the inside of the bladder and check for abnormalities. This procedure is called a cystoscopy. The doctor may take a biopsy of bladder tissue for examination in a laboratory.

Your doctor may arrange other tests, depending on the suspected cause of your kidney disorder.

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Should I Be Worried About Kidney Disease

Its important to note that symptoms associated with kidney disease are very general. They can be caused by other illnesses. In fact, around one in ten adults in Australia have signs associated with chronic kidney disease.

So, theres no need to panic please read about the risk factors such as diabetes, blood pressure, age and weight, then visit your doctor for a Kidney Health Check. Your doctor will ask about your familys medical history, along with a few questions on your general health and well being. Theyll check your blood pressure and ask you to do a urine test and blood test while youre there, too.

How Common Is Chronic Kidney Disease

  • Chronic kidney disease affects 14% of the US population.
  • 17,600 kidney transplants occured in the US in 2013 one-third came from living donors.
  • Kidney disease is more common among Hispanic, African American, Asian or Pacific Islander, and Native American people.
  • Older age, female gender, diabetes, hypertension, higher body mass index , and cardiovascular disease are associated with a higher incidence of chronic kidney disease.

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How Is It Treated

Whenever possible, doctors use surgery to remove kidney cancer. When the cancer is in its early stages and hasn’t spread, doctors are often able to remove it all, and no further treatment is needed.

When surgery isn’t possible, or if the cancer is advanced, doctors may use:

When kidney cancer is found before it has spread, about 9 out of 10 people will live 5 years or longer.footnote 1 Doctors use 5-year survival rates to show the percentage of people still alive 5 years after treatment. Of course, many people live much longer than that. In fact, for many people, the cancer never returns.

After the cancer has spread beyond the kidney, how long a person lives usually depends on how much the cancer has spread. The more the cancer has spread, the lower the survival rate.

Finding out that you have cancer can change your life. You may feel like your world has turned upside down and you have lost all control. Talking with family, friends, or a counsellor can really help. Ask your doctor about support groups. Or call the Canadian Cancer Society or visit its website at www.cancer.ca.

Why You Get Stones

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Part of preventing stones is finding out why you get them. Your health care provider will perform tests to find out what is causing this. After finding out why you get stones, your health care provider will give you tips to help stop them from coming back.

Some of the tests he or she may do are listed below.

Medical and Dietary History

Your health care provider will ask questions about your personal and family medical history. He or she may ask if:

  • Have you had more than one stone before?
  • Has anyone in your family had stones?
  • Do you have a medical condition that may increase your chance of having stones, like frequent diarrhea, gout or diabetes?

Knowing your eating habits is also helpful. You may be eating foods that are known to raise the risk of stones. You may also be eating too few foods that protect against stones or not drinking enough fluids.

Understanding your medical, family and dietary history helps your health care provider find out how likely you are to form more stones.

Blood and Urine Tests

Imaging Tests

When a health care provider sees you for the first time and you have had stones before, he or she may want to see recent X-rays or order a new X-ray. They will do this to see if there are any stones in your urinary tract. Imaging tests may be repeated over time to check for stone growth. You may also need this test if you are having pain, hematuria or recurrent infections.

Stone Analysis

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What Are The Kidneys Where Are They Located

The kidneys play key roles in body function, not only by filtering the blood and getting rid of waste products, but also by balancing the electrolyte levels in the body, controlling blood pressure, and stimulating the production of red blood cells.

The kidneys are located in the abdomen toward the back, normally one on each side of the spine. They get their blood supply through the renal arteries directly from the aorta and send blood back to the heart via the renal veins to the vena cava.

Dialysis And Peritoneal Access Dialysis

In end-stage kidney disease, kidney functions can be replaced only by dialysis or by kidney transplantation. The planning for dialysis and transplantation is usually started in stage 4 of chronic kidney disease. Most patients are candidates for both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis . There are few differences in outcomes between the two procedures. The physician or an educator will discuss the appropriate options with the patient and help them make a decision that will match their personal and medical needs. It is best to choose a modality of dialysis after understanding both procedures and matching them to one’s lifestyle, daily activities, schedule, distance from the dialysis unit, support system, and personal preference.

The doctor will consider multiple factors when recommending the appropriate point to start dialysis, including the patient’s laboratory work and actual or estimated glomerular filtration rate, nutritional status, fluid volume status, the presence of symptoms compatible with advanced kidney failure, and risk of future complications. Dialysis is usually started before individuals are very symptomatic or at risk for life-threatening complications.

Dialysis

There are two types of dialysis 1) hemodialysis and 2) peritoneal dialysis. Before dialysis can be initiated, a dialysis access has to be created.

Dialysis access

Peritoneal access

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What Is The Treatment And Management Of Chronic Kidney Disease

There is no cure for chronic kidney disease. The four goals of therapy are to:

  • slow the progression of disease
  • treat underlying causes and contributing factors
  • treat complications of disease and
  • replace lost kidney function.
  • Strategies for slowing progression and treating conditions underlying chronic kidney disease include the following:

    • Control of blood glucose: Maintaining good control of diabetes is critical. People with diabetes who do not control their blood glucose have a much higher risk of all complications of diabetes, including chronic kidney disease.
    • Control of high blood pressure: This also slows progression of chronic kidney disease. It is recommended to keep blood pressure below 130/80 mm Hg if one has kidney disease. It is often useful to monitor blood pressure at home. Blood pressure medications known as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers have special benefit in protecting the kidneys.
    • Diet: Diet control is essential to slowing progression of chronic kidney disease and should be done in close consultation with a health care practitioner and a dietitian. For some general guidelines, see the Chronic Kidney Disease Self-Care at Home section of this article.

    The complications of chronic kidney disease may require medical treatment.

    • Lightheadedness
    • Allergic reactions

    Diuretics also may cause a decline in kidney function especially if fluid is removed rapidly from the body.

    Does Kidney Failure Cause Pain

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    Kidney failure in itself does not cause pain. However, the consequences of kidney failure may cause pain and discomfort in different parts of the body.

    Amyloid proteins

    Normal functioning kidneys filter amyloid from the blood stream. In kidney failure amyloid proteins in the blood rise, and can separate and clump together forming amyloid deposits into a variety of tissue and organs, including joints and tendons. This can result in symptoms of:

    • Patients who are on dialysis may have discomfort when on the dialysis machine.

    Underlying chronic disease pain

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    Why Wait Until Your Kidneys Are Diseased

    While the study was conducted on people with kidney disease, we could safely extrapolate the recommendations to those who want to avoid kidney disease and achieve optimal kidney function now, especially as we age.

    In fact, additional research points to the actuality of physiological changes in the kidneys as we age. The research notes that a progressive reduction of the glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow are observed in conjunction with aging. The reason for these phenomena is a decrease in the plasma flow in the glomerulus, a bundle of capillaries that partially form the renal corpuscle.2

    In addition, the aging kidneys experience other structural changes, such as a loss of renal mass, and decreased responsiveness to stimuli that constrict or dilate blood vessels. The study concludes with a notable summation:

    age-related changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics, such as reduced cardiac output and systemic hypertension, are likely to play a role in reducing renal perfusion and filtration. Finally, it is hypothesized that increases in cellular oxidative stress that accompany aging result in endothelial cell dysfunction and changes in vasoactive mediators resulting in increased atherosclerosis, hypertension and glomerulosclerosis.2

    When To See A Doctor

    The symptoms of CKD are often non-specific and generalized, meaning that they can be mistaken for any number of other illnesses. Because your kidneys are highly adaptable and able to compensate for lost function, the signs and symptoms may not be apparent until irreversible damage has occurred.

    To this end, it is important to identify your personal risk factors and to see a doctor if you experience any symptoms suggestive of CKD.

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    How Is Kidney Failure Diagnosed

    Doctors use a variety of tests to measure kidney function and diagnose kidney failure. If your doctors suspect you may be at risk for kidney failure, they may recommend:

    • Blood tests, which can show how well the kidneys are removing waste from the blood.
    • Advanced imaging, which can show kidney abnormalities or obstructions .
    • Urine tests, which measure the amount of urine or specific substances in the urine, such as protein or blood.

    Are There Different Types Of Kidney Failure In Cats

    Kidney (Renal) Disease Signs & Symptoms (ex. Peripheral Edema, Fatigue, Itchiness)

    There are two types of kidney failure in cats, and they differ in causes, treatment options and prognosis.

    Acute Renal Failure

    This type of kidney failure occurs suddenly, within days or weeks. It can happen in cats of any age and typically results from poisons, disorders, diseases, organ failure, medications and other causes.

    Acute renal failure can often be reversed if caught in time.

    Chronic Kidney Failure

    With chronic kidney failure, the kidneys gradually stop working over months or years as they lose the ability to filter the blood of toxins. This type of kidney failure can lead to total kidney failure.

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    What Is Kidney Cancer

    Kidney cancer starts when abnormal cells grow out of control in one or both kidneys. The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs located on either side of the spine, just below the ribs. They filter wastes from the blood and help balance water, salt, and mineral levels in the blood.

    Another name for kidney cancer is renal cancer. “Renal” means having to do with the kidney.

    This topic is about renal cell carcinoma, the most common type of kidney cancer.

    Kidney cancer that is found early often can be successfully treated. But when it isn’t found early, the cancer may spread, or metastasize, to other parts of the body, such as the lymph nodes, the lungs, the bones, or the liver.

    Is There A Diet For Chronic Kidney Disease

    Chronic kidney disease is a disease that must be managed in close consultation with a doctor. Self-treatment is not appropriate.

    • There are, however, several important dietary rules one can follow to help slow the progression of kidney disease and decrease the likelihood of complications.
    • This is a complex process and must be individualized, generally with the help of a health care practitioner and a registered dietitian.

    The following are general dietary guidelines:

    • Protein restriction: Decreasing protein intake may slow the progression of chronic kidney disease. A dietitian can help one determine the appropriate amount of protein.
    • Salt restriction: Limit to 2 to 4grams a day to avoid fluid retention and help control high blood pressure.
    • Fluid intake: Excessive water intake does not help prevent kidney disease. In fact, the doctor may recommend restriction of water intake.
    • Potassium restriction: This is necessary in advanced kidney disease because the kidneys are unable to remove potassium. High levels of potassium can cause abnormal heart rhythms. Examples of foods high in potassium include bananas, oranges, nuts, avocados, and potatoes.
    • Phosphorus restriction: Decreasing phosphorus intake is recommended to protect bones. Eggs, beans, cola drinks, and dairy products are examples of foods high in phosphorus.

    Other important measures that a patient can take include:

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    What Are Dialysis And Hemodialysis

    Dialysis cleanses the body of waste products in the body by use of filter systems. There are two types of dialysis, 1) hemodialysis and 2) peritoneal dialysis.

    Hemodialysis uses a machine filter called a dialyzer or artificial kidney to remove excess water and salt, to balance the other electrolytes in the body, and to remove waste products of metabolism. Blood is removed from the body and flows through tubing into the machine, where it passes next to a filter membrane. A specialized chemical solution flows on the other side of the membrane. The dialysate is formulated to draw impurities from the blood through the filter membrane. Blood and dialysate never touch in the artificial kidney machine.

    For this type of dialysis, access to the blood vessels needs to be surgically created so that large amounts of blood can flow into the machine and back to the body. Surgeons can build a fistula, a connection between a large artery and vein in the body, usually in the arm, that allows a large amount of blood to flow into the vein. This makes the vein swell or dilate, and its walls become thicker so that it can tolerate repeated needle sticks to attach tubing from the body to the machine. Since it takes many weeks or months for a fistula to mature enough to be used, significant planning is required if hemodialysis is to be considered as an option.

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