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Does Ibuprofen Hurt Your Kidneys

What Is The Connection Between Ibuprofen And Kidney Disease

What Ibuprofen Does to the Body

The connection between ibuprofen and kidney damage might appear suddenly or after long-term use, depending on several risk factors. People with kidney disease might suffer acute kidney failure when using this nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug . The link between ibuprofen and kidney disease might also be diagnosed as analgesic nephropathy, a condition that might occur with long-term use of ibuprofen or other NSAID medication. Acute conditions might be reversible with dialysis, although nephropathy could cause permanent damage.

Ibuprofen is sold over the counter and used to relieve pain. It works by disrupting the bodys production of the hormone prostaglandin. The drug might be purchased under several brand names or in its generic form to treat arthritis, severe toothache pain, fever, headache, and other disorders.

Researchers found a connection between ibuprofen and kidney disease after experiments using patients with kidney disorders. One study reported acute kidney failure within a few days in three of 12 female study participants given high doses of the drug. When scientists repeated the test with recommended dosages, kidneys failed in two of the three women. The remaining nine women suffered varying degrees of kidney dysfunction at high doses, but all participants recovered once they stopped taking the medication.

How Can Medication Damage The Kidneys

Your kidneys function as your bodys filter, ridding the body of toxins and waste while returning nutrients, vitamins, hormones, and other vital substances to the bloodstream. And because the kidneys receive such heavy volumes of your bloodstream, they are susceptible to damage caused by diabetes and high blood pressure. However, inappropriate medication use can also cause kidney damage.

When you take pain medication, your kidneys filter their active ingredients into your bloodstream so that they can begin working to ease your symptoms. But because medications like Ibuprofen block body chemicals that cause the blood vessels to dilate, this results in reduced blood flow to the kidneys reducing the blood flow helps stop pain from headaches and other afflictions, but it also means less oxygen passing through to keep the kidneys healthy and functioning properly. Some medications also cause excess water retention, which can put considerable strain on the kidneys. For people suffering from medical conditions like chronic kidney disease, NSAIDs can increase the risk of kidney failure.

Taking Ibuprofen Every Day Can Cause Headaches

Taking ibuprofen can cause headaches. How’s that for a contradiction? It may be tempting to continue taking ibuprofen whenever you have a headache, but it may make the issue worse. Have you heard of a rebound headache? It’s also called a medication overuse headache, and is caused “by the frequent or excessive use of pain-relieving drugs to treat headache attacks that are already in progress,” Dr. Sait Ashina revealed in a 2019 article for Harvard Health Blog. He added that they can be disabling.

To be diagnosed with this, Dr. Ashina said a person must have headaches on more than 15 days a month for at least three months while taking a medication like ibuprofen. He listed other symptoms in addition to headache, which include nausea, vomiting, light or sound sensitivity, irritability, difficulty concentrating, insomnia, restlessness, and constipation.

Medication overuse headache is common Dr. Ashina said about one to two people out of every 100 has experienced it in the past year, though it occurs more in women. The good news is this condition should stop when you stop taking ibuprofen. Dr. Ashina warned that it could get worse before it gets better. To make sure it doesn’t happen again, don’t use ibuprofen more than two or three days a week.

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Painkillers And The Kidneys: Analgesic Nephropathy

    An analgesic is any medicine intended to relieve pain. Over-the-counter analgesics include aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen, naproxen sodium, and others. These drugs present no danger for most people when taken in the recommended dosage. But some conditions make taking even these common painkillers dangerous for the kidneys. Also, taking one or a combination of these drugs regularly over a long period of time may increase the risk for kidney problems. Most drugs that can cause kidney damage are excreted only through the kidneys.

    Analgesic use has been associated with two different forms of kidney damage. Some patient case reports have attributed incidents of sudden-onset acute kidney failure to the use of over-the-counter painkillers, including aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen. The patients in these reports had risk factors such as systemic lupus erythematosus, advanced age, chronic kidney disease, or recent heavy alcohol consumption. These cases involved a single dose in some instances and generally short-term analgesic use of not more than 10 days. Acute kidney failure requires emergency dialysis to clean the blood. Kidney damage is frequently reversible, with normal kidney function returning after the emergency is over and the analgesic use is stopped.

    For more information

    Taking Ibuprofen Daily Could Result In An Ulcer

    What Are the Contraindications for Ibuprofen? (with pictures)

    Although you may think of stomach bleeding and an ulcer as one and the same, “ulcers are sores that are slow to heal or keep returning. They can take many forms and can appear both on the inside and the outside of your body,” as defined by WebMD. When someone takes a NSAID like ibuprofen, there’s a risk of peptic ulcer or an ulcer in the lining of your stomach or upper intestine. The open sores develop when the stomach acid damages the digestive tract. Doesn’t sound like fun, does it? “You may have no symptoms, or you may feel discomfort or burning pain,” WebMD explained. This kind of ulcer can also lead to internal bleeding, so there is some overlap after all. In fact, if someone already has an ulcer, the risk of serious bleeding is greater.

    Everyday Health reported that about 15 percent of chronic NSAID users will develop an ulcer, which may not cause symptoms until it’s seriously progressed. InformedHealth.org shared in an article that people can take medication to protect their stomach from NSAID risks, but it depends on individual risk. For example, if you’re over 65, have had a peptic ulcer in the past, or take steroids, you’re more likely to develop a peptic ulcer.

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    Your Potassium Levels May Skyrocket If You Take Ibuprofen On The Regular

    What even is potassium? It’s “a mineral that your body needs to work properly,” according to MedlinePlus, and is “a type of electrolyte” that helps your nerves function, muscles contract, and heartbeat stay regular. Thus, it follows that too much or too little potassium can be harmful. Ibuprofen, in particular, can raise potassium levels as it causes kidneys to retain potassium, revealed GoodRx.

    Too much potassium, aka hyperkalemia, is defined at a level over 5.5, and it can cause “life-threatening cardiac arrest with no specific warning signs,” the website explained. If your potassium is too high, you may notice symptoms like confusion and weakness.

    NSAIDs like ibuprofen can also lead to renal tubular acidosis, a disease that occurs when the kidneys fail to excrete acids into the urine, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Although this condition is rare, a 2019 article published in Cureus highlighted the “importance of inquiring about OTC medication history and considering ibuprofen as one of the differentials in patients with a combination of refractory hypokalemia and renal tubular acidosis.” The studies cited by the publication also proved “the need to further educate patients regarding the multiple … effects of excessive NSAID use.”

    How To Safely Give Ibuprofen

    What’s in this article?Cómo administrar ibuprofeno con seguridad

    Ibuprofen is an over-the-counter medicine taken to relieve aches and pain and reduce fever. It’s a safe drug when used correctly. But too high a dose can make a child very sick. Giving too much can lead to stomach problems, confusion, and possible kidney problems. So it’s important to know how to properly give ibuprofen.

    If you have any questions about giving ibuprofen to your child, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Never give this or any other kind of medicine to a child younger than 2 years old without getting a doctor’s OK first.

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    Pain Reliever Linked To Kidney Injury In Endurance Runners

    The common practice of taking ibuprofen for pain relief while competing in ultramarathons causes an increased risk of acute kidney injury, a Stanford study says.

    Grant Lipman and his colleagues found that runners who took ibuprofen during ultramarathons doubled their risk for kidney injury.Paul Sakuma

    People who take the painkiller ibuprofen while running very long distances double their risk of acute kidney injury, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and several other institutions.

    As many as 75 percent of ultramarathoners use the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, or NSAID, in this fashion, according to Grant Lipman, MD, clinical associate professor of emergency medicine at Stanford and director of Stanford Wilderness Medicine. And while most cases of acute kidney injury appear to resolve spontaneously, the condition has the potential to progress to renal failure, he said.

    Lipman is lead author of the study, which was published online July 5 in Emergency Medical Journal. Brian Krabak, MD, a sports and rehabilitation medicine specialist at the University of Washington-Seattle, is the senior author.

    Taking Ibuprofen Every Day Could Lead To Kidney Disease

    Do Painkillers cause Kidney Damage? What should I take care of? – Dr. Brij Mohan Makkar

    Taking ibuprofen every day could negatively impact the healthy of your kidneys.

    In case you didn’t know, your kidneys are pretty important organs. As noted by the National Kidney Foundation, your kidneys work to remove waste from your body, and also produce important hormones your body needs. Anyone can see why it’s important to keep your kidneys healthy however, just like your go-to snacks are some of the worst foods for your kidneys, your go-to pain medicine just might be one of the worst medications for your kidneys. In fact, if you take painkillers like ibuprofen on a regular basis, your kidneys could get sick.

    According to the National Kidney Foundation, longterm, habitual use of medicines like ibuprofen, naproxen, and high doses of aspirin can cause chronic interstitial nephritis a disease in which the spaces between the kidney tubules become inflamed . While sporadically taking ibuprofen in recommended doses shouldn’t hurt your kidneys, medicines like Advil and Motrin should probably be avoided if you already have kidney-related diseases or other issues.

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    What Are Nsaids Are They Safe To Take

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are a specific group of pain relievers. Some NSAIDs are available over the counter. This includes different brands of ibuprofen, naproxen sodium and ketoprofen.

    NSAIDs are usually safe for occasional use when taken as directed, but if you have known decreased kidney function, they should be avoided. These medications should only be used under a doctor’s care by patients with kidney disease, heart disease, high blood pressure or liver disease or by people who are over 65 or who take diuretic medications. NSAIDs may cause an increased risk of sudden kidney failure and even progressive kidney damage.

    If You Taken Ibuprofen Every Day You Could Develop Internal Bleeding

    Ibuprofen is a medicine cabinet staple for many families across the globe, as the over-the-counter painkiller is widely believed to be safe for people of all ages.

    Whether you have a headache or a toothache, or you’re suffering from those pesky period cramps, ibuprofen is great for relieving pain. However, if you take too much of it every day, the NSAID can actually cause your body to bleed excessively.

    Research from the Spanish Center for Pharmacoepidemiological Research in Madrid found that regular use of ibuprofen was fine however, when taken in excess every day, things could turn worrisome . According to the study, higher doses of ibuprofen could mean a “five-fold increased risk” of gastrointestinal bleeding or torn stomach lining. And as Alberta Health Services warns, if you already have gastrointestinal or rectal bleeding, taking ibuprofen or other NSAIDs to ease the pain might actually cause the bleeding to worsen.

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    Key Points About Analgesic Nephropathy

    • Long term use of pain killers can cause damage to the kidneys. This includes over-the-counter and prescription pills.
    • This condition is most common in people older than 45 years of age, and more prevalent in women over 30.
    • Often there are no symptoms. It may be found on routine blood or urine tests.
    • Symptoms are related to the build-up of toxins and waste products that are normally filtered by the kidneys.
    • Analgesic nephropathy can lead to acute kidney failure, cancer, or atherosclerosis in later stages.

    Watch Out For Your Kidneys When You Use Medicines For Pain

    Is Ibuprofen Bad for Kidneys

    What do you do if you have a headache, fever, or muscle pain? Chances are you go to the local drug store to pick up an overthecounter pain medicine. These drugs are the medicines most often used by Americans. Pain medicines, also called analgesics, help relieve pain, fever, and even inflammation. These medicines may help with arthritis, colds, headache , muscle aches, menstrual cramps, sinusitis and toothache.

    These drugs are effective and usually safe. However, it is important to realize that no medicine is completely without risk. They should be used carefully. When used improperly, pain medicines can cause problems in the body, including the kidneys. According to the National Kidney Foundation, as many as 3 percent to 5 percent of new cases of chronic kidney failure each year may be caused by the overuse of these painkillers. Once kidney disease occurs, continued use of the problem drug makes it worse.

    Nonprescription pain medicines should not be used without your doctors permission if you know you have low kidney function. Also, even if your kidney function is good, longterm use with high doses of these pain drugs may harm the kidneys. Kidney damage happens because high doses of the drugs have a harmful effect on kidney tissue and structures. These drugs can also reduce the blood flow to the kidney. If you are older, your kidneys may have a stronger reaction to these medicines and you may need a smaller dose.

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    Are Nsaids Safe To Take If You Have Kidney Disease

    NSAIDs are usually safe for occasional use when taken as directed. However, if your doctor has told you that you have low kidney function, NSAIDs might not be right for you. These medications should only be used under a doctor’s care by patients with kidney disease. Also, they might not be the best choice for people with heart disease, high blood pressure or liver disease. Some of these drugs affect blood pressure control. High doses over a long period of time can also lead to chronic kidney disease and even progress to kidney failure.

    For people without kidney disease, the recommended dose of aspirin can be safe if you read the label and follow the directions. When taken as directed, regular use of aspirin does not seem to increase the risk of kidney disease in people who have normal kidney function. However, taking doses that are too large may temporarily and possibly permanently reduce kidney function. In people with kidney disease, aspirin may increase the tendency to bleed.

    Keeping Kidneys Safe: Smart Choices About Medicines

    On this page:

    If you have chronic kidney disease , diabetes, or high blood pressureor if you take certain blood pressure medicines that affect your kidneysyou should take steps to protect your kidneys from harm.

    ACE inhibitors and ARBs are two types of blood pressure medicine that may slow the loss of kidney function and delay kidney failure. You can tell if youre taking one of these medicines by its generic name. ACE inhibitors end in pril and ARBs have generic names that end in sartan for example, lisinopril and losartan.

    You may also take a diuretic, sometimes called a water pill, to meet your blood pressure goals.

    The information below explains

    • actions you can take to keep your kidneys safe while taking these blood pressure medicines
    • why you sometimes need to take special care with medicines for example, when youre sick, dehydrated, or thinking about whether or not to take an over-the-counter medicine

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    Do Nsaids Cause Kidney Injury

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, are medications that help to reduce inflammation. They also control pain and fever and are available over the counter and by prescription. Common NSAIDs include ibuprofen , aspirin , and naproxen sodium . These drugs are typically safe if they are used infrequently, but for people with decreased kidney function or chronic kidney disease, they should be avoided.

    Are NSAIDs safe to take?NSAIDs are typically safe to use. However, many patients are sensitive to the side effects of these medications, even with normal kidney function. If you have reduced kidney function or have a number of other medical conditions, you may be much more likely to have problems with taking these drugs.

    NSAIDs can affect kidneys by several different mechanisms. They can cause high blood pressure and can also interact with some blood pressure drugs in a way that prevents them from working correctly such as diuretics, ACE inhibitors, and ARBs which are a group of drugs that are designed to relax blood vessels. NSAIDs may increase your fluid retention and can lead to decreased blood flow to kidneys. This is because NSAIDs block prostaglandins, which are the natural chemicals that dilate blood vessels and allow oxygen to reach the kidneys to keep them alive and healthy.

    As the regional expert in the diagnosis and treatment of kidney disease, Ochsner offers a full range of nephrology services. Learn more here.

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