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Where Does It Hurt With Kidney Stones

Prevention Of Future Stones

Where Do Kidney Stones Hurt?

Once your health care provider finds out why you are forming stones, he or she will give you tips on how to prevent them. This may include changing your diet and taking certain medications. There is no “one-size-fits-all” diet for preventing kidney stones. Everyone is different. Your diet may not be causing your stones to form. But there are dietary changes that you can make to stop stones from continuing to form.

Diet Changes

Drink enough fluids each day.

If you are not producing enough urine, your health care provider will recommend you drink at least 3 liters of liquid each day. This equals about 3 quarts . This is a great way to lower your risk of forming new stones. Remember to drink more to replace fluids lost when you sweat from exercise or in hot weather. All fluids count toward your fluid intake. But it’s best to drink mostly no-calorie or low-calorie drinks. This may mean limiting sugar-sweetened or alcoholic drinks.

Knowing how much you drink during the day can help you understand how much you need to drink to produce 2.5 liters of urine. Use a household measuring cup to measure how much liquid you drink for a day or two. Drink from bottles or cans with the fluid ounces listed on the label. Keep a log, and add up the ounces at the end of the day or 24-hour period. Use this total to be sure you are reaching your daily target urine amount of at least 85 ounces of urine daily.

Reduce the amount of salt in your diet.
Eat the recommended amount of calcium.

Ways Your Diet Can Help Prevent Kidney Stones

So you want to avoid being the one in 12 women who will get kidney stones in their lifetime, what should you do?

  • Avoid a high-salt diet, processed foods, canned foods, cheeses, bottled salad dressings, high-salt snack foods and baked goods. Avoiding these are all part of a healthy diet anyway and the rise of these foods in our diet has been associated with the obesity epidemic.
  • Eat your fiber, eat your fruits and veggies without salt.
  • Make sure you drink enough water. Getting dehydrated or lower fluid intake is a risk for stone formation.
  • The calcium story is mixed. Some studies suggest that increased calcium increases the risk, some show that it doesn’t. Don’t restrict your calcium but don’t get too much because some sources of calcium like cheese are high in sodium.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Obesity is a risk but maybe it’s the foods that are associated with obesity that we already mentioned.
  • If you’ve had a stone, talk to your doctor about what kind of stone you made. What minerals were the crystals made of and what should you do to decrease your risk of recurrence. In the interest of full disclosure and as I am disclosing it, isn’t a HIPAA violation. I’m a middle-aged, chubby, pizza-loving woman who is one of the one in 12. And having a kidney stone certainly got my attention, I was very impressed.

    Fever And Chills Along With Your Back Pain

    This could also mean that you have a urinary tract infection.

    If you have any of these symptoms, along with your back pain, you should call your doctor right away.

    If your pain is unbearable, is associated with fevers or chills, or you have nausea and vomiting that is preventing you from keeping down fluids or medications, you should seek immediate medical attention, Nguyen says.

    If youre in the Los Angeles area and are looking for exceptional care, the experts at USC Urology at Keck Medicine can help. Schedule an appointment or call .

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    Treating And Preventing Kidney Stones

    Most kidney stones are small enough to be passed in your pee, and it may be possible to treat the symptoms at home with medication.

    Larger stones may need to be broken up or removed with surgery.

    It’s estimated up to half of all people who have had kidney stones will experience them again within the following 5 years.

    To avoid getting kidney stones, make sure you drink plenty of water every day;so you do not become dehydrated.

    It’s very important to keep your urine pale in colour to prevent waste products forming into kidney stones.

    The kidneys are 2 bean-shaped organs that are roughly 10cm in length.

    They’re located towards the back of the abdomen on either side of the spine.

    The kidneys remove waste products from the blood. The clean blood is then transferred back into the body and the waste products are passed out of the body when you pee.

    What Side Do You Lay On For Kidney Stones

    How to Relieve Kidney Stone Pain Fast

    Using patients as their own internal controls, it was demonstrated that 80% of patients lying in a lateral decubitus position with the left side down had demonstrably increased renal perfusion in the dependent kidney and 90% of patients who lay with their right side down had similar increased perfusion.

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    What Is A Kidney Stone

    A kidney stone is a hard object that is made from chemicals in the urine. There are four types of kidney stones: calcium oxalate, uric acid, struvite, and cystine. A kidney stone may be treated with shockwave lithotripsy, uteroscopy, percutaneous nephrolithomy or nephrolithotripsy. Common symptoms include severe pain in lower back, blood in your urine, nausea, vomiting, fever and chills, or urine that smells bad or looks cloudy.

    Urine has various wastes dissolved in it. When there is too much waste in too little liquid, crystals begin to form. The crystals attract other elements and join together to form a solid that will get larger unless it is passed out of the body with the urine. Usually, these chemicals are eliminated in the urine by the body’s master chemist: the kidney. In most people, having enough liquid washes them out or other chemicals in urine stop a stone from forming. The stone-forming chemicals are calcium, oxalate, urate, cystine, xanthine, and phosphate.

    After it is formed, the stone may stay in the kidney or travel down the urinary tract into the ureter. Sometimes, tiny stones move out of the body in the urine without causing too much pain. But stones that don’t move may cause a back-up of urine in the kidney, ureter, the bladder, or the urethra. This is what causes the pain.

    Causes Of Kidney Pain

    Kidney pain has many possible causes. These organs are connected to others like your bladder and ureters, where you store and get rid of urine.

    Kidney stones. Intense, sudden, stabbing pain may be a kidney stone. These are mineral deposits that can grow large enough to block a ureter, a tube that connects your kidney and bladder. If that happens, you’ll feel sharp pain or cramps in your back or side. It can also spread out to your groin. As you try to pee out the stone, you might feel waves of pain.

    Kidney infection. Also called pyelonephritis, this infection could cause discomfort in one or both kidneys. You may feel pain in your back, in your side or both sides under your ribs, or in your groin. You’ll also have a fever. Urinary tract infections also cause discomfort in this organ.

    Kidney swelling. This condition, called hydronephrosis, can happen if your kidneys are blocked. Your urine can’t drain the way it should and builds up in your kidneys. This can happen in one or both kidneys and sometimes it causes pain.

    Kidney cysts. You may not feel a simple kidney cyst until it grows larger. Once it gets big, you might feel a dull pain in your side or back, or feel pain in the upper part of your belly.

    Polycystic kidney disease. This genetic disease causes many cysts to grow in your kidneys. They may cause you to feel a pain in your back or side.

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    Where Is Kidney Stone Pain Located

    The sharp pain associated with a kidney stone moves as the stone progresses through your urinary tract. The most common places to feel pain are in your:

    • Lower abdomen or groin
    • Along one side of your body, below your ribs
    • Lower back

    However, while pain is certainly the most noticeable symptoms of kidney stones, it’s not always the earliest sign or even the most telling sign, for that matter.

    “The pain associated with a kidney stone typically isn’t felt until after its already formed and is passing through your urinary tract,” explains Dr. Kannady. “In addition, due to differences in anatomy, men and women describe kidney stone pain slightly differently. Not to mention that pain itself is relative and everyone has a different threshold for it.”

    Plus, the intensity of the pain isn’t necessarily a measure of how problematic the kidney stone might be or become. Smaller stones that are likely to pass on their own can still be very painful. And not every kidney stone that requires medical intervention comes with gut-wrenching pain.

    “Any time you’re experiencing pain, it’s important to see your doctor. But if you’re experiencing pain, even if it’s only mind, in combination with the kidney stone symptoms above and, in particular, if you have a fever or severe trouble urinating it’s definitely important to see your doctor,” warns Dr. Kannady.

    Pregnancy And Kidney Pain

    How much does a kidney stone hurt?

    Pregnancy can sometimes cause kidney pain. Being pregnant puts you at a greater risk of developing a urinary tract infection or blood clots all which can cause a sensation of pain in your middle back.

    Dr. Melissa Conrad Stöppler on MedicineNet, says that during pregnancy the uterus becomes enlarged and the urine flows slower. You could even experience vesicoureteral reflux where urine flows back up the urinary tract. This means that it is easier for bacteria to enter the urinary tract and spread the infection to the kidneys.14

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    Urge To Urinate Or Frequent Urination

    Sometimes people with kidney stones feel like they need to peea lot. This symptom depends on where the stone is located.;Stones that are close to the bladder will have a lot of bladder symptoms: frequency, urgency, needing to get to the bathroom quickly, and going small amounts, Dr. Pearle notes.

    The reason? Stones irritate the walls of the bladder and that manifests as the bladder contracting, she says, which makes you feel like youve gotta go.

    If not a lot of pee comes out, you might think youre having trouble passing urine. But those bladder contractions can occur even if your bladder is empty, Dr. Peale explains. Unless the stone is actually in the urethra, there shouldnt really be trouble urinating, she says. You should always be making urine.

    Going A Small Amount At A Time

    Large kidney stones sometimes get stuck in a ureter. This blockage can slow or stop the flow of urine.

    If you have a blockage, you may only urinate a little bit each time you go. Urine flow that stops entirely is a medical emergency.

    Its common for people with a kidney stone to have nausea and vomiting .

    These symptoms happen because of shared nerve connections between the kidneys and GI tract . Stones in the kidneys can trigger nerves in the GI tract, setting off an upset stomach.

    The nausea and vomiting can also be your bodys way of responding to intense pain .

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    What Does Kidney Pain Feel Like

    Your kidneys are fist-sized organs shaped like beans that are located at the back of the middle of your trunk, in the area called your flank. They are under the lower part of your ribcage on the right and left sides of your backbone.

    Their main job is to filter waste out of your blood and produce urine to remove that waste along with extra fluid from your body.

    When your kidney hurts, it usually means theres something wrong with it. Its important to determine whether your pain is coming from your kidney and or from somewhere else so that you receive the right treatment.

    Because there are muscles, bones, and other organs around your kidney, its sometimes hard to tell if its your kidney or something else causing your pain. However, the type and location of the pain and other symptoms you are having can help point to your kidney as the source of your pain.

    Can Kidney Stone Symptoms Come And Go

    Kidney Stones

    The length of time a stone can hang around is the primary reason that a person may feel like kidney stone symptoms come and go.

    Once you start feeling the pain of a kidney stone, it can take anywhere between one to four weeks for the stone to actually pass. In the meantime, the pain can seem sporadic. Here’s why:

    “During a bout of kidney stones, the initial pain is typically caused by the stone making its way through your very narrow ureter tube. There can also be pain if the stone lodges itself there and blocks urine flow out of the kidney, which results in pressure buildup and painful swelling,” explains Dr. Kannady.

    As your body tries to move the kidney stone through your ureter, some of your pain may also be from the waves of contractions used to force the kidney stone out. The pain may also move as the kidney stone moves along your urinary tract.

    “Once the stone makes it to your bladder, the pain might subside to some degree and you may notice urinary symptoms in its place. The final push from your bladder to outside of your body can reignite sharp feelings of pain, as the stone is now passing through another narrow tube called your urethra,” says Dr. Kannady.

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    Treatment Of Kidney Stones

    For smaller kidney stones, pain relievers may be the only treatment needed. On average it takes five to seven days to pass a kidney stone, says Dr. Abromowitz. It may pass sooner. And if the stone is very high in the ureter, it can take up to two weeks.

    Larger stones that block urine flow or cause infection may require surgery, such as:;;

    • Shock-wave lithotripsy, a noninvasive procedure using high-energy sound waves to break stones into fragments that pass out in the urine
    • Ureteroscopy, in which an endoscope is inserted through the ureter to retrieve or break up the stone;
    • Percutaneous nephrolithotomy or nephrolithotripsy, used for very large or irregularly shaped stones. For both procedures, a small incision is made in the back to provide access for a nephroscope, a miniature fiberoptic camera, and other small instruments. Your doctor then either removes the stone or breaks up and removes the stone .;

    For ongoingprevention of recurring kidney stones, your doctor may prescribe increasing fluid intake, changing diet, controlling weight, and taking medication.

    To learn more about kidney stones, talk to your doctor or health care provider or search for a provider.

    How Long Do Kidney Stone Symptoms Last

    As mentioned, the time frame for these symptoms can be as short as a week or up to a month and beyond. So, even if it feels like your kidney stone pain has subsided, it’s important to reach out to your doctor since sporadic pain is common with this condition.

    “While some kidney stones pass on their own, others require treatment such as medications or procedures to help break up the stone or even surgical removal. Your doctor can perform the tests needed to determine whether the stone is likely to pass on its own or if you might need treatment. In addition, your doctor can help you manage the pain associated with passing the stone,” adds Dr. Kannady.

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    If You’ve Had A Stone The Problem Is Likely To Recur But It Doesn’t Have To Use These Strategies For Prevention

    The pain associated with kidney stones has been described by some as more excruciating than childbirth. Kidney stones are small, hard stones, formed when high levels of minerals in your urine start to crystallize in your kidneys, forming a pebble-like mass. The pain comes when these stones migrate from your kidneys through the ureters, which are the narrow tubes that carry urine from your kidneys into your bladder.

    “Kidney stone pain is not subtle,” says Dr. Gary Curhan, a professor of epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. It typically starts in the flank, at the side of the lower back. Sometimes if the stone moves, the pain migrates to the front of the body.

    Occasionally a stone gets stuck as it enters the bladder and causes symptoms such as a feeling of urgency or frequent urination that can be mistaken for a urinary tract infection or bladder irritation.

    There are actually several different types of kidney stones with different causes. The most common types are

    • calcium stones

    • struvite stones

    • cystine stones.

    The stones themselves vary in size, from as small as a grain of sand to as big as a golf ball.

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    • fever and chills
    • urine that smells bad or looks cloudy

    The kidney stone starts to hurt when it causes irritation or blockage. This builds rapidly to extreme pain. In most cases, kidney stones pass without causing damage-but usually not without causing a lot of pain. Pain relievers may be the only treatment needed for small stones. Other treatment may be needed, especially for those stones that cause lasting symptoms or other complications. In severe cases, however, surgery may be required.

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    Can Kidney Stones Be Prevented

      Rather than having to undergo treatment, it is best to avoid kidney stones in the first place when possible. It can be especially helpful to drink more water since low fluid intake and dehydration are major risk factors for kidney stone formation.

      Depending on the cause of the kidney stones and an individual’s medical history, changes in the diet or medications are sometimes recommended to decrease the likelihood of developing further kidney stones. If one has passed a stone, it can be particularly helpful to have it analyzed in a laboratory to determine the precise type of stone so specific prevention measures can be considered.

      People who have a tendency to form calcium oxalate kidney stones may be advised to limit their consumption of foods high in oxalates, such as spinach, rhubarb, Swiss chard, beets, wheat germ, and peanuts. Also drinking lemon juice or lemonade may be helpful in preventing kidney stones.

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