Wednesday, January 18, 2023
HomeExclusiveIs Ibuprofen Bad For Liver Or Kidneys

Is Ibuprofen Bad For Liver Or Kidneys

Taking Ibuprofen Every Day Isnt Exactly Great For Your Liver

What Ibuprofen Does to the Body

Ibuprofen may be your best friend when a headache hits, but the NSAID definitely isnt your livers pal.

The health of your liver is obviously important, as its one of the bodys largest and most vital organs. And while there are plenty of things you can do to boost your livers health, not taking ibuprofen every day could just be one of the most helpful things you could possibly do for your liver. According to experts, if you take ibuprofen every day, youre actually doing your liver a major disservice.

In fact, a 2020 study published in Scientific Reports found that ibuprofen can permanently damage the liver. Overall, our data indicate that moderate doses of ibuprofen can affect liver more significantly than previously reported and include proteasome dysfunction, increased levels of H2O2, impaired glycolytic pathways and altered fatty acid synthesis and oxidation, the study concluded. The increased levels of hydrogen peroxide can damage the liver, according to researchers who spoke with Medical News Today. As the researchers emphasized, its best to steer clear of ibuprofen unless absolutely necessary, despite its reputation of being a generally safe, over-the-counter medicine.

Taking Ibuprofen Every Day Isn’t Exactly Great For Your Liver

Ibuprofen may be your best friend when a headache hits, but the NSAID definitely isn’t your liver’s pal.

The health of your liver is obviously important, as it’s one of the body’s largest and most vital organs. And while there are plenty of things you can do to boost your liver’s health, not taking ibuprofen every day could just be one of the most helpful things you could possibly do for your liver. According to experts, if you take ibuprofen every day, you’re actually doing your liver a major disservice.

In fact, a 2020 study published in Scientific Reports found that ibuprofen can permanently damage the liver. “Overall, our data indicate that moderate doses of ibuprofen can affect liver more significantly than previously reported and include proteasome dysfunction, increased levels of H2O2, impaired glycolytic pathways and altered fatty acid synthesis and oxidation,” the study concluded. The increased levels of hydrogen peroxide can damage the liver, according to researchers who spoke with Medical News Today. As the researchers emphasized, it’s best to steer clear of ibuprofen unless absolutely necessary, despite its reputation of being a generally safe, over-the-counter medicine.

Kidney Health Problems Linked To Ibuprofen Use

The widely used, non-prescription pain reliever ibuprofen is increasingly being linked to serious long-term health problems, including kidney failure, according to two new studies.

One report, a small study of 12 patients at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions in Baltimore, found that one-quarter of those who took the drug developed acute kidney failure, that was reversed once the drug was stopped. The study will be published later this year in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

A second study of 554 adults by researchers at the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences found that ibuprofen can cause kidney failure in individuals with other health problems, such as high blood pressure, heart disease and pre-existing kidney problems. That report, which is the second part of a study published last spring in the New England Journal of Medicine, was presented in July at the Fourth International Nephrotoxicity Symposium in England.

Our concern is that if patients take this stuff for great lengths of time and not just in short bursts of therapy that they could wind up with kidney damage, said William L. Henrich, a kidney specialist and professor of medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas.

Higher doses of ibuprofen are available by prescription, and in September, the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of a liquid form of the drug, available only by prescription, for children under 12.

Don’t Miss: Does Kidney Infection Cause Diarrhea

Liver Disease And Acetaminophen: Can You Take It Safely

My doctor told me I cant use acetaminophen because I have liver disease. Is that true?Doctors often tell patients with liver disease that they shouldn’t use acetaminophen, a common over-the-counter pain reliever found in Tylenol and many other cold and flu medications. Acetaminophen is broken down by the liver and can form byproducts that are toxic to the liver, so this warning is not completely without merit.But take it from a hepatologist, acetaminophen is the best option for pain relief for people with liver disease.

Is Ibuprofen Bad For My Kidneys

PPT

While NSAIDs rarely affect the liver, they have important adverse effects on the kidney that you should know about. Here is the science behind the problem. Ibuprofen and other NSAIDs block prostaglandins, natural body chemicals that normally dilate blood vessels leading to the kidneys. Blocking prostaglandins may lead to decreased blood flow to the kidneys, which means a lack of oxygen to keep the kidneys alive. That can cause acute kidney injury.

A simple blood test may show a rise in creatinine if your kidneys are being affected, usually seen within the first three to seven days of NSAID therapy. Acute kidney injury can occur with any NSAID, though naproxen seems to be a bigger culprit. In one study, folks who took NSAIDs had twice the risk of acute kidney injury within 30 days of starting to take the NSAIDs. Good news is its reversible if you stop taking them.

Who is at risk? In people with high blood pressure, taking NSAIDs long-term may worsen underlying high blood pressure. Also, people with existing kidney problems more often get in trouble with NSAIDs. Regardless, if you are taking ibuprofen for long periods of time, its not a bad idea to have a check of your kidney function with a quick blood test. Remember, acute kidney injury from NSAIDs doesnt cause any symptoms.

Don’t Miss: Std That Causes Kidney Pain

What Are The Clinical Signs Of Ibuprofen Poisoning

Ibuprofen poisoning may cause many different signs because several organ systems can be affected. Signs can vary depending upon the dose and product to which the dog was exposed.

Most commonly , signs related to irritation and ulceration of the gastrointestinal tract are seen. These may include decreased appetite, vomiting , diarrhea, depression, abdominal pain, dark tarry stools, pale gums, and bloody stools.

Other signs can include incoordination, increased or decreased drinking and urination, yellow discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes pale mucous membranes, agitation, tremors, seizures, and coma.

What Pain Relievers Are Safe For Kidneys

Generally speaking, all pain relievers are safe for kidneys when used as directed on the bottle or by your doctor. But if you have kidney failure or are predisposed to kidney problems, then it may be in your best interest to avoid it altogether. Stick to medications like Tylenol, Midol, and Excedrin, which use acetaminophen as their active ingredient to play it safe.

You May Like: Is Club Soda Good For Kidney Stones

You Might Get Nauseous If You Take Ibuprofen Every Day

Ibuprofen may be the first medicine you reach for when a late-night of drinking and partying leaves you with a killer headache and unshakeable nausea. However, many people likely don’t realize that their preferred hangover cure could actually cause them to feel even more sick to their stomach.

Like any drug, ibuprofen comes with a handful of not-so-serious side effects. However, just because these side effects aren’t as serious as a heart attack, doesn’t mean they’re pleasant to deal with. This is especially true when it comes to nausea, a super common side effect of taking too much ibuprofen every day.

According to National Health Services, taking too much ibuprofen can result in nausea and vomiting. And, in addition to nausea and vomiting, Healthline reports that constipation and diarrhea are also two of ibuprofen’s nasty side effects. Of course, these ailments might be avoided by remembering to take ibuprofen with food and not on an empty stomach, but that’s not a guarantee.

Coverage And Cost Comparison Of Acetaminophen Vs Ibuprofen

Liver Cirrhosis Vlog Taking Ibuprofen Was A Bad Idea Today, Possible Mild Internal Bleeding

Acetaminophen can be purchased over the counter and is available in generic and branded forms. Medicare and most insurance plans may not cover acetaminophen because of its widespread availability without a prescription. The average cash price for generic acetaminophen can be as high as $11.99. By using a SingleCare discount card, you can save more and bring the cost down to about $2 for a bottle of generic acetaminophen.

In general, Medicare and most insurance plans will cover ibuprofen. Ibuprofen is available as a generic or brand-name drug. The usual cash price for ibuprofen is around $15. This cost can be reduced by using a SingleCare coupon. Depending on the pharmacy you use, the cost can be lowered to around $4 for a bottle of 200 mg ibuprofen.

Read Also: How Much Money Is A Kidney Worth

If I Need Pain Medicines What Can I Do To Keep My Kidneys Healthy

Kidney disease caused by pain relievers is often preventable. Here are some things you can do to help keep your kidneys healthy.

How you take these medicines makes a difference:

  • Make sure you read the warning label before using any overthecounter analgesics.
  • Do not use overthecounter pain relievers more than 10 days for pain or more than three days for fever. If you have pain or fever for a longer time, you should see your doctor.
  • Avoid using pain medicines that contain a combination of ingredients, like aspirin, acetaminophen and caffeine mixed together in one pill.
  • If you are taking pain medicines, increase the amount of fluid you drink to six to eight glasses a day.
  • If you are taking pain medicines, avoid drinking alcohol.

Talking with your doctor about pain medicines can also make a difference:

  • If you have kidney disease, ask your doctor before taking a pain medicine, particularly NSAIDs and higher dose aspirin.
  • If you have high blood pressure or heart disease, make sure you only take NSAIDs under your doctors supervision. This is especially important if you take diuretic medications or are over 65 years of age.
  • Make sure your doctor knows about all medicines you are taking, even over-the-counter medicines.

Tips For Taking Ibuprofen To Avoid Liver Damage And Other Side Effects

Is ibuprofen bad for your liver? Maybe, and it can have other side effects if taken in a wrong way. So extra care is needed when taking ibuprofen.

Before Taking Ibuprofen

Note that you should inform your doctor, pharmacist or dentist in the following cases:

  • You have a history of high blood pressure or hypertension.
  • You have ever had deep vein thrombosis or any other blood clotting conditions.
  • You have had a problem with your liver or kidney functions.
  • You have a history of blood sugar and cholesterol.
  • You have allergic reactions to certain medicines or asthma.
  • You have any history of stomach or duodenal ulcers.
  • You are either pregnant, trying for a baby or already breastfeeding.
  • You have a heart condition.
  • You have ever experienced an allergic reaction to any other NSAIDs such as diclofenac, aspirin, indomethacin, and naproxen.
  • You suffer from any connective tissue conditions like lupus .

How to Take Ibuprofen

Also Check: Yerba Mate Kidney Stones

What Can You Do For Your Pain Instead

TL DR: Taking ibuprofen daily comes with plenty of health risks, which is why Dr. Morgan recommends opting for a topical pain reliever to ease your symptoms, such as an anti-inflammatory gel or lidocaine patch. “Topicals are not absorbed as much into your bloodstream and into your system , so working locally at the area where you’re having your pain tends to be a safer option,” she explains. If you’re suffering from an unbearable headache and a gel isn’t in the cards, Dr. Morgan suggests home remedies such as going for a walk and practicing deep breathing to help create some relief. And for throbbing period cramps, consider applying a heating pad or hot water bottle to your lower abdomen, taking a hot bath, or rolling out your yoga mat and flowing through a few stretches to alleviate some of the pain.

What Causes Ibuprofen Poisoning

Ibuprofen liver alcohol â discover these amazing ...

Ibuprofen, and other NSAIDs, act by blocking certain chemical processes in the body that cause inflammation. Unfortunately, these chemical processes are also important in maintaining normal gastrointestinal, kidney, liver, and blood clotting functions.

When ibuprofen is ingested, it is absorbed quickly into the blood stream. Instead of being removed from the body, ibuprofen is released from the liver and reabsorbed in the intestines repeatedly. This recycling prolongs the poisoning effects. Poisoning may occur from a single dose or repeated dosing. Puppies and older dogs have a higher risk of being poisoned. Other current medical conditions such as kidney disease, or liver disease may increase the risk of poisoning. Dogs that are already taking steroids or another NSAID also have a higher risk of developing signs including gastrointestinal ulceration.

You May Like: Medical Term For Kidneys

Watch Out For Your Kidneys When You Use Medicines For Pain

What do you do if you have a headache, fever, or muscle pain? Chances are you go to the local drug store to pick up an overthecounter pain medicine. These drugs are the medicines most often used by Americans. Pain medicines, also called analgesics, help relieve pain, fever, and even inflammation. These medicines may help with arthritis, colds, headache , muscle aches, menstrual cramps, sinusitis and toothache.

These drugs are effective and usually safe. However, it is important to realize that no medicine is completely without risk. They should be used carefully. When used improperly, pain medicines can cause problems in the body, including the kidneys. According to the National Kidney Foundation, as many as 3 percent to 5 percent of new cases of chronic kidney failure each year may be caused by the overuse of these painkillers. Once kidney disease occurs, continued use of the problem drug makes it worse.

Nonprescription pain medicines should not be used without your doctors permission if you know you have low kidney function. Also, even if your kidney function is good, longterm use with high doses of these pain drugs may harm the kidneys. Kidney damage happens because high doses of the drugs have a harmful effect on kidney tissue and structures. These drugs can also reduce the blood flow to the kidney. If you are older, your kidneys may have a stronger reaction to these medicines and you may need a smaller dose.

Is Acetaminophen Or Ibuprofen Better

Ibuprofen is more effective than acetaminophen for treating inflammation and chronic pain conditions. Ibuprofen is FDA-approved to treat osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis whereas acetaminophen may be used off-label for these conditions. However, acetaminophen is generally more tolerable than ibuprofen in regards to side effects.

Don’t Miss: What Can Cause A Swollen Kidney

How Does Ibuprofen Or Acetaminophen Affect To Kidney

NSAIDs have important unfavorable effects on the kidney that you should know about.

Here is the science behind the issue. Ibuprofen and other NSAIDs hinder prostaglandins, and that can cause an issue due to the fact that prostaglandins dilate capillary resulting in the kidneys, according to iytmed.com. Preventing prostaglandins may result in kidney anemia and therefore severe kidney injury.

A simple blood test might show a rise in creatinine if your kidneys are being affected, typically seen within the first 3 to seven days of NSAID therapy. Severe kidney injury can occur with any NSAID though naproxen appears to be a bigger culprit. In one study, folks who took NSAIDs had twice the risk of acute kidney injury within 30 days of starting to take the NSAIDs. Good news is its reversible if you stop taking them.

In individuals with hypertension, taking NSAIDs long term may aggravate underlying hypertension. Individuals with kidney problems at baseline regularly get in difficulty with NSAIDs, however if you are taking ibuprofen for extended periods of time its not a bad idea to have a check of your kidney function with a quick blood test. Keep in mind, intense kidney injury from NSAIDs does not cause any symptoms.

Bottomline

NSAIDs are safe for the liver, but can cause a problem with kidney function that is reversible if you stop taking them. Typically safe but worth taking notice of.

Does Meloxicam Have More Side Effects Than Ibuprofen

What They Don’t Tell You About IBUPROFEN- Affects Healing?

Because meloxicam and ibuprofen are both NSAIDs, they have similar side effects, which may include abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, heartburn, nausea, tinnitus, and a rash.

All NSAIDs carry a risk of cardiovascular disease, including an increased risk for blood clots, stroke, or a heart attack however, the risk with meloxicam appears higher than with ibuprofen .

Meloxicam is also more likely than ibuprofen to cause gastrointestinal disturbances, such as gastric bleeding and ulceration. Consuming more than three alcoholic beverages per day while taking any NSAID increases the risk of GI disturbances.

Also Check: Is Grape Juice Good For Kidney Stones

How Should This Medicine Be Used

Prescription ibuprofen comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken three or four times a day for arthritis or every 4 to 6 hours as needed for pain. Nonprescription ibuprofen comes as a tablet, chewable tablet, suspension , and drops . Adults and children older than 12 years of age may usually take nonprescription ibuprofen every 4 to 6 hours as needed for pain or fever. Children and infants may usually be given nonprescription ibuprofen every 6 to 8 hours as needed for pain or fever, but should not be given more than 4 doses in 24 hours. Ibuprofen may be taken with food or milk to prevent stomach upset. If you are taking ibuprofen on a regular basis, you should take it at the same time every day. Follow the directions on the package or prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take ibuprofen exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than directed by the package label or prescribed by your doctor.

Ibuprofen comes alone and in combination with other medications. Some of these combination products are available by prescription only, and some of these combination products are available without a prescription and are used to treat cough and cold symptoms and other conditions. If your doctor has prescribed a medication that contains ibuprofen, you should be careful not to take any nonprescription medications that also contain ibuprofen.

RELATED ARTICLES

Most Popular